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How to pick the perfect Christmas tree at Whitney’s Farm

First you have to select the type of tree that you would like

  • If you are looking for a tree that is very fragment then a Balsam fir is the tree for you
  • If you are looking for a tree that has good needle retention and strong branches to hold all of your ornaments then a Frasier fir is the tree for you
  • If you are looking for a tree that has soft and fluffy branches with a soft fragrance then a Douglas fir is for you
  • If you are looking for a tree that has very dense branching and thick branches then a Blue Spruce is for you

Make sure to measure the area that you are putting your tree to make sure you select the correct size. Take into account the height of the stand you will be using as well as the height of the tree topper that you will be using. Now that you have selected the type of tree that you want you need to make sure that is a good strong healthy tree

  • Grab a branch of the tree with your hand a pull the needles through your hand and if needles do not easily remove then you have found a healthy tree
  • Spin the tree around on the peg to see if it loses a lot of needles keep looking, firs will lose interior needles normally, and you do not want to see needles falling off of the branches. If the needles are falling off the branches keep looking.
  • You want to look for a tree that is dark green in color, if the tree is a pale green or brown keep looking.

Getting your tree wrapped in tree netting is the best way to transport your tree and easiest way to get your tree into your home. Make sure that you cut at least 1” off of the bottom of the tree. This allows for water to move through the tree once it is in your home.

Make sure to have your tree securely attached to your vehicle as you leave the lot, you do not want to lose it driving down the road. We provide a fresh cut, tree netting and we secure the tree to the top of your car for all for the trees that we sell off of our Christmas tree lot.

Once you get it home you want to get it set up right away. Using a stand straight type of tree stand will make setting up your Christmas tree much easier then setting it up with a conventional tree stand. The stand straight tree system is a stand that has a tapered pin in the center of the stand.

We will drill a hole in the bottom and center of the tree for you and when you get home all you have to do it put the tree on the peg in the stand, add some hot water and tree preservative, remove the netting and you are ready to decorate.

Once you tree is in the house and in its stand make sure you add hot water, the hot water keeps the sap in the tree from stiffening up and allows the tree to absorb more water. You do not want the water level in your tree stand to go below the cut end of your Christmas tree, if this happens the sap in the tree will dry out and your tree will not be able to absorb water. The addition of a tree preservative can greatly extend the life your Christmas tree.

Not all insects are harmful to your garden; in fact, many are beneficial and are an important part of the ecosystem. Chemicals used to eliminate insects do not discriminate between the good bugs and the bad ones, so you can limit the damage done to beneficial insects and, at the same time, keep harmful chemicals out of the environment by practicing organic pest control.

Here are a few simple and effective ways to eliminate bugs and other pests naturally:

Handpicking: Insects can be handpicked from plants, and pests like potato bugs can easily be shaken from plants into a box. Use a butterfly net to capture white cabbageworm butterflies before they lay their eggs on your crucifers.

Traps: Slugs love to slurp beer from cans strategically placed in the garden, but don’t open the tops all the way lest the openings become two-way streets. Sticky traps hung in apple trees attract and trap apple maggot flies. Brush-on insect trap coating can be applied to small boards on stakes and used throughout the garden. Painting the boards a bright color will make them even more effective. Pheromone traps draw insects like Japanese beetles to their own hormonal scents and safely capture them in boxes away from prized roses and peonies.

Covers: Using lightweight floating covers on crops such as blueberries keeps those pesky birds, rabbits, and deer from eating you out of house and home. Of course, don’t install them until after pollination so that bees can do their job first.

Biological Pest Control: Releasing beneficial bugs into your garden to feed on bad bugs is a fine way of eliminating pests. Ladybugs love aphids, and certain wasps lay eggs on the eggs of other insects, such as cutworms and cornborers; when the wasp eggs hatch, they feed on the pest eggs. The bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is found in spray form and is used to control cabbageworms and their cousins.

Botanical Pest Control: Natural insecticides made from plants like the pyrethrum daisy (Tanacetum coccineum) are used very effectively and are a major force in the bad bug patrol. Pyrethrum, rotenone, and sabadilla are a few of these botanicals, which disperse quickly and do not leave residues.

Moonlit Gardens

Although gardeners often dream of sun-splashed borders filled with stately perennials, many are discovering that their daisies, daylilies, and daffodils are working overtime, bringing the garden to light…at night! Welcome to the world of the garden after dark.

With busy families finding fewer daylight hours to enjoy their gardens, it makes perfect sense to create a moonlight retreat in which family and friends can gather after hours. Spending balmy evenings out-of-doors is a wonderful luxury after the chill of winter…and during the scorching days of summer, the relative cool of the nighttime garden will come as a welcome respite. For the romantic at heart, few things are more enchanting than a midnight stroll through flowers kissed by moonlight.

How do you begin to create such a paradise? The secret is to select white and pale-colored plants that shimmer in the night. You’ll find that many of your favorite flowers, which you thought only bloomed in blue or hot pink, have been hybridized for white color or a very pale interpretation of their darker counterparts. Annuals like petunias, impatiens, and snapdragons all have white cousins, along with perennials, such as echinacea (coneflower) and campanula. You may also be surprised to learn at what time of day many flowers open. While some, like daylilies, as the name suggests, actually close at nightfall, others, such as evening primrose and moonflower, with its lemony scent, come alive right along with the peepers and crickets.

Just like any other garden, the moonlit garden should be filled with plants of different heights and habits, shapes and textures. Plants with variegated or white-edged foliage like euonymus, ivy, and hosta, add contrast to the garden and will sparkle in the dim light just like the flowers. Shrubs like spirea provide a backdrop for lower-growing plants like cosmos and artemisia, while a well-placed trellis or fence can lend support to lacy curtains of clematis and passionflower. A bench beneath an arbor brimming with white wisteria and climbing roses or a garden swing flanked by fragrant lilac or mock orange is an intoxicating spot to while away an evening. You’ll find that the strong fragrance will not only attract hopeless romantics, but also the “butterflies of the night,” moths, which will flit and flutter throughout the moonlit garden feeding on sweet nectar. Special touches complete the scene: A serpentine path lined with phlox, baby’s breath, and lilies, will invite a leisurely stroll, and a rustic lantern will allow you to enjoy your garden even on those nights when the moon is hidden by clouds.

A warm summer’s night, a trickle of water from a nearby fountain, and some soothing music from a speaker hidden beneath a shrub–the stage is set for spending a relaxing evening with friends and family in the magical land of the midnight garden.