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The Pothos plant is one of the most popular houseplants for a good reason – it’s low maintenance and forgiving, making it the ideal choice for new gardeners. This lush, green plant can be grown in a variety of settings, from low light to bright, indirect light, making it ideal for any home or office.

One of the main benefits of the Pothos is its ability to purify the air. It naturally filters out harmful toxins such as formaldehyde, benzene, and xylene, making it a great choice for improving indoor air quality. This means that not only does it look great, but it can also improve your health and well-being.

Another great thing about Pothos is that it’s very hardy. Unlike other houseplants that require frequent watering and attention, Pothos can go a few days without water and still thrive. This makes it ideal for busy people who don’t have a lot of time to devote to plant care. Additionally, Pothos is resistant to pests and disease, so it won’t be prone to any major problems that could harm it.

Another aspect that makes Pothos the best houseplant for new gardeners is its ease of propagation. All you need to do is cut a stem, place it in water, and it will start to root. Once the roots are established, you can plant it in soil and it will grow into a new plant. This makes it easy to keep a large collection of Pothos plants in your home, without having to spend a lot of money buying new plants.

All this makes the Pothos is the perfect houseplant for new gardeners due to its low maintenance, air-purifying capabilities, hardiness, and ease of propagation. Whether you’re looking to add a touch of greenery to your home, or you’re looking to improve indoor air quality, the Pothos is a great choice. Its beautiful green leaves and ease of care make it a plant that you’ll enjoy for years to come.

Starting a vegetable garden for the first time can be an exciting and rewarding experience. Here are some tips for starting your seeds indoors to give your plants a head start before transplanting them to your outdoor garden.

Seeds:

  • Choose seeds that are well-suited for your climate and the time of year.
  • Look for organic vegetable seeds as they are a great option for home gardens and provide healthier food options.
  • Read the seed packet carefully and follow the instructions for planting, spacing and depth.

Seed Trays:

  • Use seed trays that are specifically designed for starting seeds indoors. These trays have cells or compartments that are the right size for small seedlings.
  • Make sure the trays have drainage holes so that excess water can escape and prevent root rot.
  • Fill the trays with a quality seed starting mix, which is a light and well-draining mix of soil, perlite and vermiculite.

Grow Lights:

  • If you don’t have access to natural sunlight, consider using grow lights to provide your seedlings with the light they need to grow.
  • Place the grow lights about 2-4 inches above the seedlings and adjust the height as the plants grow taller.
  • Choose grow lights with a spectrum of light that is suitable for plant growth. LED grow lights are a great option as they are energy-efficient and provide full spectrum light.

In conclusion, starting seeds indoors is a great way to get a head start on your vegetable garden. Our garden center has a great selection of seeds, including many organic and non GMO options. By choosing the right seeds, seed trays and grow lights, you can give your seedlings the best possible start and ensure a successful harvest. Happy gardening!

In general, plant foods fall into one of two categories: (1) Synthetic Fertilizers and (2) Natural Organic Fertilizers. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages.

SYNTHETIC PLANT FOODS

Synthetic Fertilizers are materials that are manufactured chemically as opposed to found ready made in nature. In general, synthetic fertilizers fall into one of two categories: (1) Water soluble and (2) Controlled release fertilizers.

Water Soluble Plant Fertilizers. Water soluble plant foods completely dissolve in water and release their nutrients immediately thereafter. They are ideal when you need a quick solution to a problem and for nursery growers who have a drip irrigation system. The trade-off for rapid response is that the feeding is generally short lived, lasting approximately a few weeks. Frequent applications are required as well as mixing with water. Leaching can also be a problem, especially in sandy soils or under high moisture conditions. And burn (dehydration) potential is higher due to solubility and high salt index. Examples of water solubles include: urea, ammonium sulfate and ammonium phosphate.

Controlled Release Fertilizers contain a plant nutrient in a form that delays its availability for plant uptake significantly longer than a water soluble fertilizer. The delay occurs by one of two mechanisms: (1) Coating a water soluble source such as urea with molten sulfur, wax, or plastic. The thicker the coating, the slower the release. Examples include sulfur coated or polymer coated urea. (2) Chemically combining materials to form insoluble polymers, which release nutrients more slowly as the length and number of polymers increases. Ureaform is an example of this. While both types give plants a long lasting feeding, neither contains all of the advantages that you will find with natural organics.

NATURAL ORGANIC FERTILIZERS

Although no universal definition exists for the term “natural organic”, our guiding definition is any material derived from plant, animal or mineral origin that contains one or more essential nutrients for plant growth. While it is true that all fertilizers ultimately feed nutrients to plants in the chemical form, it is the process by which they are delivered that makes natural organic plant foods superior to others.

“Feed the soil that feeds the plants”. Plant growth is dependent on the health and vitality of the soil surrounding it. The process by which natural organic fertilizer  deliver their nutrients enhances the fertility and structure of the soil. Natural organic fertilizers are digested by soil microorganisms, which then release the nutrients in a form available to plants. This process produces humus, a spongy material that improves soil structure. When you improve soil structure, the soil is better able to hold the proper balance of water, air and nutrients until they are required by plants. Plants respond by developing larger root systems. Larger roots support more vigorous top growth and make plants less susceptible to drought. And by stimulating a healthy population of beneficial microorganisms in the soil, plants become more resistant to insects and diseases.

Slow, steady feeding, as the plants require it. The nutrients in natural organic fertilizers are not in a readily available form for plants to use until they are digested by beneficial microorganisms in the soil. This process is slow and largely dependent upon three factors: the microbial population in the soil, moisture, and soil temperature. A healthy population of microbes in the soil is necessary for the digestion process. Moisture is required to sustain microbial life as well as to keep nutrients flowing into the plants root zone. And soil temperature is critical because as it rises, plants require nutrients more rapidly. Fortunately, microbial activity mimics these requirements and also increases as soil temperature rises, so that plants can be fed the needed nutrients, as they require them.

The safest choice for your plants and the environment. Unlike synthetic plant foods, natural organic fertilizers have an extremely low salt index , which means there is little to no risk of burning (dehydrating) plants in periods of extreme drought or when over-applying. Natural organic plant foods are generally very resistant to leaching out of the soil, so their nutrients stay in the root zone until the plants need them. And since most natural organic ingredients are byproducts from commercial farms and meat processing plants, the utilization of them for feeding plants is really a system of recycling much like composting.

Soil and plants receive much more than just the primary nutrients. With natural organic fertilizers, they receive organic matter containing millions of beneficial microbes (bacteria, fungi and protozoa) that help improve soil structure for better moisture retention, nutrient retention, aeration and drainage. They receive secondary and trace nutrients as well as vitamins, minerals, and plant growth hormones that promote plant growth and improve resistance to insects, diseases and climate extremes.

Examples of natural organic ingredients include: bone meal, blood meal, kelp meal and greensand. It is for all of the above reasons that we have always used natural organics as the primary source of nutrition in our Tone line of products. It has established the Espoma Tones as the finest, safest, and most reliable plant foods available.

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Now is the time to put the holidays behind us and start dreaming about your home and garden landscape. Gardening magazines are a great source of inspiration and ideas. There are also thousands of websites, photo sharing sites and social media links that are loaded with ideas. With that in mind we thought it might be a good source of inspiration for your garden. Bear in mind not all plants are available or appropriate for all areas, but they can help with color and texture combinations that we can help you achieve in your garden. Take a look and let us know what you think!

Garden Design

The Spruce

Country Living

House Beautiful

Proven Winners

Monrovia Nursery

Burpee Seeds

We invite you to stop in and talk over your ideas for your garden. We know the right plants for our area and our staff has years of experience with plants and garden design. We’re always here to help!

Is your lawn looking weak and thin? Overseeding can help you get back to the thick, lush, green lawn you’ve always wanted. By spreading grass seed over your existing lawn, you can thicken up the thin areas, and your lawn will start to look terrific again. (This is different from reseeding, which is when you start over and plant a completely new lawn.)

When to Overseed

In the North, the best time to overseed your lawn is in the fall, when the soil is still warm but the air is cooler, and there are fewer weeds for new grass to compete against. Since your trees are starting to shed their leaves, there’s plenty of sunlight. However, if you are unable to overseed the lawn in the fall, your next best time is the spring. If you live in the South, the best time for overseeding is late spring through mid-summer, since warm-season grasses need warmer soil temperatures to germinate.

 

Why Overseed?

Over time, grass gets old and needs to be replaced. Worn-out lawns invite weeds. Overseeding is a fast, inexpensive way to help bring your lawn back to its lush, green self without tearing everything out and starting over.

1. Mow Low

Before overseeding your thin lawn, cut your grass shorter than normal and bag the clippings. After mowing, rake the lawn to help loosen the top layer of soil and remove any dead grass and debris. This will give the grass seed easy access to the soil so it can root more easily after germinating.

2. Choose a Grass Seed

Which type of grass seed you choose depends on your existing grass type. If your lawn consists of cool-season grasses, choose a product specially designed to thicken thin lawns. If your lawn has a warm-season grass or you are unsure of the best grass for your area, the people at the garden center can help you choose the right seed for your lawn. If you don’t know what type of grass you have, consult our staff for help.

3. Improve the Soil

If you’re using grass seed to overseed your lawn it’s a good idea to rake in a thin, 0.25-inch layer of enriched soil over your lawn to help the seed settle in. Don’t put so much down that you kill your existing grass; less than a quarter of an inch is plenty. 

4. Spread the Seed

You’ve cut the lawn short, raked it, and removed any debris. Now comes the easiest part of the overseeding process: Just fill up your spreader, adjust the setting according to the label directions, and apply. Don’t have a spreader yet? A rotary spreader is an excellent choice for small lawns—it’s simple to use and spreads product quite smoothly. For larger lawns, a drop spreader might be the best spreader for your yard.

5. Feed and Water

To give your new grass seedlings the essential nutrients they need for fast growth, apply a starter (or for late season seeding use a Fall fertilizer) after you’ve spread the grass seed. Afterward, no matter which product you used to overseed, be sure to keep the soil consistently moist by lightly watering once or twice a day until the seedlings have reached the height of the rest of your lawn. 

Thanks to Scotts for these lawn care tips.

Every gardener knows it. Fall is for planting. From the cooler weather and heaps of rain to fewer pests, diseases and weeds, fall has distinct planting benefits.

Throughout the fall we will identify some of the best plants and activities to do in fall. Stay tuned for our expert tips, guest blog posts and giveaway’s.

But in the meantime, learn why planting in fall can make spring gardening much, much easier.

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6 Reasons Why Fall is the Best Time to Garden

1. Work is Easier on Plants… And You

The cooler air temperatures are easier on both plants and gardeners. Neither of you need to suffer through the intense summer heat. Yet, in fall, the soil is still warm enough for roots to thrive. They will grow and get established until the ground freezes.

2. There is More Time in Fall

There are more good days for planting in fall than in spring, when bad weather can make being outside impossible. Plus, you have more free time as a gardener than during the spring rush.

Note: The window for fall planting ends six weeks before your average hard frost, usually September or October.

3. Mother Nature Does the Watering for You

In many regions of the country, fall showers happen often. You might not ever have to water new plantings, which means less maintenance for you. However, due to the cooler temperatures, it’s a cinch to water plants if it doesn’t rain at least 1” per week.

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4. Easier Weed Control

In the fall, weed seeds are dormant, i.e., they don’t grow. So any weeds that do grow up in your flowers are easily removed when they first appear as sprouts in spring.

5. Bye-Bye Pests and Diseases

Pests and diseases are less prevalent in the fall. Most of the bugs are either dead or preparing to hibernate in fall. Plus, the humidity that promotes many diseases fades away.

6. Fall Planting Results in Earlier Blooms

Like fall-seeded lawns, fall-planted wildflower seed has a chance to “settle” into your site during the winter, and is ready to burst into growth in early spring. This is why fall-planted wildflower seed is up and in bloom about two weeks earlier than spring-planted seed.

While all of these make compelling reasons to garden in the fall, the season also means bargain time at garden centers. Check back often for the best deals.

Thanks to Espoma for sharing this gardening tip!