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We have had many inquiries regarding IF and WHEN we will be able to open U Pick. PLEASE READ THOROUGHLY

The good news is YES!!! We will be open for picking once we have ripe fruit, and enough berries to accommodate U pick. 

MDAR (Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources) has released guidance for Pick-Your- Own farms to follow in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In order to protect the health and safety of our staff and guests, along with meeting the requirements set by the State, 

Upick will need to run differently this season.

Click here to see the full Bulletin released by MDAR

https://www.mass.gov/…/mdar-bulletin-16-farm-pick…/download…

WHAT TO EXPECT:

Social distancing of at least 6 feet will be observed and maintained in all areas of the farm.

Masks are required to enter the farm. Any guests over the age of 2 must properly be wearing a mask.

Eating or sampling fruit in the fields and orchards is not permitted, by order of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

No reusable containers or bags are allowed at this time. 

You must check in at the Farm Market or Corn Truck to pick up your container. We will provide a new, single use container for your picking. Please do not bring backpacks, used shopping bags, plastic containers etc. into fields.

Children MUST remain within arm’s reach of family members or guardians.

We will continue to offer online ordering, you can order Whitney’s grown blueberries through our websites at https://whitneysfarm.com/product-category/farm-market/produce/

We know change can be difficult, but these rules are in place for the best interest of all, and mandated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. U pick activities and our Farm Store provide an important method of getting local produce into the food supply chain and into your homes. In order for the State to fully reopen, and things return to some sort of normalcy, we need to do our part to stop the spread of Covid 19, while still providing the community with nutritious, delicious, and healthy produce.

Despite the pandemic challenges, the crops look great! We look forward to seeing you all and a successful 2020 season.

Did you know that Easter lilies are the fourth largest potted plant crop grown in the U.S.? With Easter approaching, no doubt many homes and churches will soon be graced with the fragrant and lovely white trumpet-shaped flowers, symbolic of spring, purity and the Lord’s Resurrection. But how can you enjoy your fragrant flower long after the holiday? We have some helpful tips.

Caring for Your Potted Easter Lilies

To keep your potted Easter lily as its best, it prefers a cool daytime temperature of 60° to 65° F. and nighttime temperatures 5 degrees cooler. To keep the flowers from wilting, avoid placing the potted plant in direct sunlight. Most plants will lean toward the sunlight. To keep the plant growing upright, turn the pot every two days.

Keep the plant moist, but not soggy. Most Easter lilies are sold commercially in pots covered with decorative foil jackets. No water should be left standing at the bottom of this covering or the life of the lily will be ruined. Remove the pot from the foil covering every time the plant is watered. Once the water has soaked into the soil, return the pot to the foil covering.

Also, to help your potted lily thrive, do not place the pot near a direct source of heat. Lilies thrive in a humid climate, more so than a dry one. To create natural humidity, fill a saucer with small pebbles and water and set beneath the potted lily.

How to Transfer Easter Lilies to the Garden

Your Easter lily plant can be introduced into your flower garden for annual enjoyment. Transplant it outdoors once all danger of frost has passed and when the flower stops blooming. 

The plant needs to be in well-drained soil, just as it did when it was potted. To provide the needed drainage, add peat moss and perlite to rich organic soil.

Plant the lily bulbs, roots down, 3” inches beneath the surface of the soil and water. If planting more than one bulb, position them at least 12” inches apart. Cut back the stems once the plant appears dead. This will cause new growth to begin and possibly another bloom this summer. Next year, look for a June or July bloom.

Gardeners tend to be optimistic. The simple act of planting a tree shows vision, creativity and yes, even hope. Sowing seeds is an act of faith, a fundamental belief in the natural world. One knows that with fertile soil, water and light, anything is possible. Gardens of contentment are borne in cities and in the country, in grand designs and in simple windowsills. The fact is, we garden because it makes us feel good.

Frederick Law Olmsted, the landscape architect who was the creative force behind the design of New York’s Central Park observed that viewing a scene in nature “employs the mind without fatigue and yet exercises it, tranquilizes it and yet enlivens it; and thus, through the influence of the mind over the body, gives the effect of refreshing rest.”

This observation could be judged to be more true today than when Mr. Olmsted was quoted back in 1865. In a day and age when work has become more stressful than ever, where daily lives are played out in an environment with higher levels of noise, crime and intensity, it’s understandable that people feel a general fatigue. Even work here at the nursery takes on an almost frenetic pace during the spring season. Where do we turn for relief? A quiet greenhouse or sales yard in the early morning hours. Like you, we turn to the garden…we connect with nature. Whether it is for five minutes or hours spent transplanting seedlings, we emerge refreshed, rejuvenated and somehow inspired.

There is something to be said for stopping to take notice of the world around you. It may seem trite, but taking the time to stop and smell the roses can lead to better health, a sharper mind and reduced stress. While we are force fed advice on how we should reduce our fat intake, increase our non-impact aerobic workouts, and oh, yeah….spend more quality time with the children, we’d like to present an alternative available right in your own backyard.

The Warm-up-

Start by taking in the morning air. Pulling weeds can be your opening stretching exercise. Comb your landscape and lawn for any and all invaders. Take your time, enjoy whatever is sprouting. Your neighbors will think you are strange, but they’ll be amazed by your weed free (all-organic, by the way) garden.

20-minutes to a leaner, greener you!

In the time it takes to rake your yard, or mow your lawn you can achieve quite an enjoyable aerobic workout. The great part is, you feel better from the results you’ve achieved, and from the physical activity that goes into it-a natural high!

A lush, green lawn, an exquisite flower, the sight of a cardinal…these acts of nature that make us feel good. They lift the spirits and improve people’s general feeling of well being. A garden can be just the right medicine for what ails you.

Gardening is a great opportunity to connect with yourself, your natural environment, and your inner creativity and self-expression-and it’s an activity you can enjoy as a family. Tend your garden daily. Planting the seeds for tomorrow’s blooms could just improve your health at the same time!

We are offering a new Curb Side Pickup for all of our products. We are looking forward to serving you while keeping our staff and this community safe.

We appreciate your patience as we work out the details and kinks of the system. This is a new way to do business for you and for us. Here are the details on how to order Deli, Bakery, and Grocery Items.

Orders can be placed on our website – order here – over the phone at 413-442-4749 or through email at whitneyscurbside@gmail.com.

Here are a few guidelines to make the process go as smoothly as possible:

Please remember to include your Full Name and cell phone number in your message with your list of items. We will need that to process your order and communicate with you.

We are only accepting Credit Card payments at this time. Payments must be made over the phone. We will ask for payment information when we call you if you have ordered through email.

We need a two hour window between the time your grocery order is placed and the time it is available. This does not include our deli and bakery items which will have a 20 minute pick up time.

Orders will be placed on the front porch of the Farm Market and will be tagged with your last name. If you are unsure which order belongs to you please call 413-442-4749 and we can assist you in finding it.

Please give us a call when you are on your way so we can be sure that your order is in place and ready for pick up. Also keep your phone handy after placing your order in case we need to reach you to verify information.

Thanks for your patience and support. We look forward to seeing you soon

We are offering a new Curb Side Pickup for all of our Garden Center products. We are looking forward to serving you while keeping our staff and this community safe.

We appreciate your patience as we work out the details and kinks of the system. This is a new way to do business for you and for us. Here are the details on how to plant material, bagged product, and bulk products.

Orders can be placed over the phone at 413-442-4749 or through email at whitneyscurbside@gmail.com.

Here are a few guidelines to make the process go as smoothly as possible:

  • Please remember to include your Full Name and cell phone number in your message with your list of items and quantities you are looking for. We will need that to process your order and communicate with you.
  • We are only accepting Credit Card payments at this time. Payments must be made over the phone. We will ask for payment information when we call you if you have ordered through email.
  • Bulk product for delivery is always available over the phone at 413-442-4749 or through email at whitneyscurbside@gmail.com. We do have a 2 yard minimum and a delivery fee depending on the town.
  • If you would like to purchase bulk products for pick up, call us when you have arrived. When placing your order for pick up, please provide the type of vehicle and color of vehicle that will be picking up.
  • When ordering any plant material please be sure to specify the pot size and quantity.
  • If you need help loading a curbside order into your vehicle please advise us ahead of time so we can have a staff member ready to assist you.

Orders that are ready for pick up will be placed in front of the info shed located in front of the greenhouse. Larger nursery stock orders will be placed in front of the green barn next to our nursery. The orders will be tagged with your last name. If you are unsure which order belongs to you please call 413-442-4749 and we can assist you in finding it.

Please give us a call when you are on your way so we can be sure that your order is in place and ready for pick up. Also keep your phone handy after placing your order in case we need to reach you to verify information.

Thanks for your patience and support. We look forward to seeing you soon

What is a Shamrock Plant? The potted shamrock plant (Oxalis regnellii) is a small specimen, often reaching no more than 6 inches. Leaves are in a range of shades and delicate flowers bloom off and on during fall, winter and spring. Leaves are clover shaped and some think the plant brings good luck.

It has clover-shaped leaves that grow in variable shades of green and purple tones. Shamrock plants bloom periodically, with delicate white or pink flowers which peek out from clusters of leaves throughout their growing season. These whimsical, living good luck symbols can be enjoyed during the fall, winter, and spring months.

Shamrock plants differ from most house plants in a few ways. For one, Shamrock plants grow from tiny bulbs that may be planted outside in fall or early spring, depending on the hardiness zone in which you live. They also fold up at night and re-open when light returns. These plants require a dormant period in the summer time, and will begin to shut down, which Shamrock plant owners sometimes mistake for the plant being dead.

Shamrock Plant Care Tips

  1. Place the plant in an area that is room temperature and receives good air circulation and bright, but not direct, light.
  2. Soil should be kept lightly moist. Water sparingly and allow the soil to dry out between waterings.
  3. Fertilize with a balanced houseplant food every few months.
  4. When leaves begin to die back in late spring or early summer, the plant is telling you that it needs a time of dormancy to rest. At this time, move the plant to a cooler, darker location, away from direct light and do not water of fertilize it. The dormant period varies and may last anywhere from a few weeks to three months, depending on the cultivar and the conditions.
  5. After the first couple weeks of dormancy, check your plant for new growth every week or so.
  6. When new shoots appear, the dormancy period has ended. Move the plant back to a brighter location and resume the recommended regular plant care.

If more is better, than a lot should be great! That seems to be the logic when buying grass seed. To get the best results when seeding this spring, it might help to understand a few of the basics. Let’s take a look at a typical seed label:

First of all, what do those names mean? They are usually proprietary varieties that were specifically bred for optimum results. With improvements in seed breeding and technology in the past 7-10 years, these new varieties are more disease and pest resistant. However, over half the lawns in North America are over 7 years old. Newer varieties have definite advantages.

How about germination? The second set of numbers is the germination rate of the seed. Like anything else there are different grades and qualities of grass seed. Watch out for this number. The higher the number the better. Why pay for seed that won’t grow.

What is “other crop seed?” The seed listed here is for the “off types” of seed that can detract from the quality of the lawn. These are usually fillers used in lower priced mixes. The lower the percentage, the better.

Why is there weed seed listed? If there is any weed seed present it is listed by percentage of weight. While you don’t want any weed seed, it is difficult and expensive to keep them out. Similarly avoid those listing obnoxious weeds.

What exactly is “inert matter?” Inert matter is just what it sounds like. This is substance in the box or bag that is not capable of growth. Usually it is filler added to take up space. The lower the percentage the better.

How much seed do you really need? In depends on your application. In full sun, figure about 4-5 lbs for 1000 (M) sq. ft for a new lawn and about 1.5 lbs/M for overseeding. In deep shade your numbers shuld be more like 3 lbs/M for a new lawn and 1.5 lbs/M for overseeding.

Ready to get going? Measure your area. With an understanding of the basic facts, area, conditions (soil, sun, shade) and a better understanding of how to read a seed label, you’ll have greater success with your next seeding project and save time and money! We’re here to help!

Monstera may be the perfect houseplant for you if you’re looking to create a big, bold, tropical feel in your home. It features big (2-foot-wide) leaves that look like they have holes or cuts in them, giving rise to two of its other common names: Swiss cheese plant and split-leaf philodendron (while monstera is not a type of philodendron, it is closely related to them).

While young, this houseplant has a dense, bushy shape, but as it grows, it wants to vine out. You can keep it bushy with regular pruning, or let it climb up a vertical support (such as fishing line fastened into the ceiling), for a decidedly bold and tropical look.

Grow monstera just about anywhere in your house! It tolerates low light, but grows faster and becomes more dramatic in a bright spot. In most areas, it can take some direct sun on its leaves when grown in the house.

Water monstera regularly — enough to keep the soil from drying out. The plant is somewhat drought tolerant, so you don’t need to worry about keeping up with the watering all time time. It’s a survivor! 

Fertilize monstera a few times in spring and summer to keep it happiest, especially if the leaves start to look light green or pale around the veins. You can fertilize it more regularly — even weekly — if you want more growth. Either way, use a houseplant fertilizer and adhere to the directions on the product packaging.